Last edited by Vudomi
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

8 edition of What students really think of professors found in the catalog.

What students really think of professors

an analysis of classroom evaluation forms at an American university

by Linda A. Jackson

  • 197 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by E. Mellen Press in Lewiston .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • College teachers -- Rating of -- United States -- Case studies,
    • College students -- United States -- Attitudes -- Case studies

    • Edition Notes

      StatementLinda A. Jackson and Michael Murray.
      SeriesMellen studies in education ;, v. 35
      ContributionsMurray, Michael, 1950-
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsLB2333 .J36 1997
      The Physical Object
      Pagination147 p. :
      Number of Pages147
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL666933M
      ISBN 100773486100, 0889469350
      LC Control Number97012633

      -Elizabeth Reis, Professor and Chair, Women’s and Gender Studies Department, University of Oregon “This is the book I wish I had when I was a grad student. As The Professor Is In, Karen Kelsky delivers generous, savvy advice for academic job seekers. Unflinching, supportive, and honest, there is no other book . Let's first get this out of the way. There is indeed some abysmally bad teaching out there, and sometimes the tenure system is to blame, and the evaluation criteria do not prioritize teaching. That's general knowledge and the boring part of the an.

      Some professors hate all students at first, until they are convinced that they won't be any trouble or that they have enough intellectual skill that the professor won't have to work so hard. Not.   There is an air of mystique (and kudos) surrounding the title “Professor”. On the one hand, it conjures up tired stereotypes (think eggheads and batty scientists), and on the other, those elite, high-flying scholars soaring through the academic stratosphere (think Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking or even Brian Cox).

      Students Really Really Want Teachers To Record Lectures As more and more students at more and more schools discover how helpful it is to be able to review recorded class lectures while studying, the demand from students for more professors to record class lectures grows stronger. What do you think about the professors who are selling the books to the store? What do yo Skip Navigation. Chegg home. Books. Study. What Do You Think About The Students Who Are Purchasing The Books From The Store? This question hasn't been answered yet Ask an expert.


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What students really think of professors by Linda A. Jackson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Others, lots of others, bought the book. In October, the book sold copies on Amazon and briefly rose to No. among all Amazon books. In December, Bryant and Stratton College in Buffalo ordered 34 copies for its faculty. The book has helped at least one professor: this editor. What Students Really Think.

A new book by undergraduates at Michigan State offers teaching advice based on thousands of comments from students starting with the prompt, 'To my professor. The use of a professor’s own textbook is controversial among college students today.

While the other facets have frustrated students for years, this one is gaining traction as more and more professors write about their research findings.

And some professors, when they do this, assign their textbook with their findings to their students. He cited the American Association of University Professors, which ruled that the textbook hustle isn’t inherently unethical.

Lots of students take classes to dive deeper into a professor’s own studies, the association said, and besides, professor profits are “trivial or nonexistent.”.

Business Insider asked professors from U.S. News & World Report's 10 best American colleges to recommend "the single book they think every student should read in ," and their suggestions run.

We asked students to tell us about their favorite professors. Many of you may have read, or are in the process of reading your student reviews from this past semester. As educators, you may not always hear or read about the positive impact you have had on the lives of your students.

For students, those $ books add up to real money. The average student spends over $1, on textbooks each year; some spend more, and at. – The purpose of this article is to report on a large‐scale survey that was carried out to assess academic users' awareness, perceptions and existing levels of use of e‐books.

The survey also seeks to find out about the purposes to which electronic books were put, and to obtain an understanding of the most effective library marketing and communication channels., – An e‐mail. Professors have long assigned to their students works of which they were the author.

The practice ranges from assigning commercially published textbooks they have written to having students buy a volume they have written and published or course packs made up of. Professor: *explains what class needs to do for homework* Student, five minutes later: “What do we need to do for homework?” Oh my lord.

The things instructors want to say but will not when a student doesn’t listen. When you don’t listen, instructors are already pegging you as someone who isn’t paying attention, ever. Professor Sitter said, “I didn’t have any small classes in college but if I had, I would have been one of the ones who didn’t speak much.

I’ve had quiet students who do really good work, thoughtful papers, thoughtful conversations outside of class.” It’s all in how you present yourself to your professors. "If there is one book that every new faculty member should read this is it."-John D.

Foubert, Journal of College Student Development "Lucas and Murry offer advice that most seasoned faculty would agree with. The authors believe that faculty can couple good judgment with their sound advice for the improvement of the academic s: 3. While normally I think of female students getting with male professors, it was actually pretty evenly split between men and women.

In fact, it was men who were a. Ironically, while students think that “all profs do is teach,” teaching is where professors receive the least training, if any at all.

Reading Jeff Anderson’s book The Skinny on Teaching: What You Don’t Learn in Graduate School led me to reflect on how unprepared I was to teach at the start of my career. Plus they really cut corners with the grading and questions too (often out-sourcing those to the original authors of the book as part of the contract to update the book annually).

The only way to solve this is to put pressure on colleges, departments, and professors. Publishers are doing what they're meant to: trying to make every cent they can. Professors often ask students to email them to book appointments.

But in a tech-dominant world, they are increasingly turning to Doodle polls, Google spreadsheets, or sites such as or to book sessions.

Office hours are a good opportunity for faculty and students to discuss the material one-on-one (or in small. Not all students are inherently opposed to the idea of professors assigning their own books. In an interview with Insider, University of Alabama political science major Grace Schepis said it may actually be beneficial to have the class material authors explain their work in person.

Numerous professors who responded to an inquiry on Twitter said they encourage students to get the cheapest option they can — e-book, rental, library book, photocopy, borrowed book, or. If you want to know why students should connect with their professors think of this sad image: There she is sitting in her office surrounded by books and maybe a wilting plant.

The Lonely Professor. Piles of papers on her desk and no one comes to see her. She has her lonely apple for lunch. When interacting with students, I try to be as objective as possible, keeping the focus on the issue or topic of interaction, rather than on them or me. In that sense, any student is as likeable as any other.

However, we are all humans with hu. What do faculty and students really think about e-books? Ian Rowlands, David Nicholas, Hamid R. Jamali and Paul Huntington CIBER, University College London a large-scale benchmark survey of faculty and students at one institution, University College London, profiling their use and perceptions of e-books.The first whisper reads, "I'm a teacher, and the biggest way I could let my students down is if they don't see how much I care about " You can't miss this.

22 Teachers Reveal What They Really Think About Their Students. In fact, as the book notes, “at faculty meetings, department chairs notice that professors can be just as digitally distracted as some of their students.” (The book itself doesn’t take a stand on whether professors should ban tech or not, though it outlines pros and cons of several strategies.).